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No guitar player was more instrumental to the popularity of the MXR brand than Eddie Van Halen. Beginning with the groundbreaking “Eruption,” Eddie has continued to use MXR pedals such as the Phase 90, the Flanger, and others to create his iconic sound. The year 2014 marks MXR’s 40th anniversary, and Eddie was gracious enough […]

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Category: Artist News, MXR

Your first instrument mod should be installing a set of Straplok Strap Retainers. Guitars and basses ain’t cheap, so protect your artistic investment—don’t rely on stock strap buttons to keep your instrument from falling straight onto the floor. Many a player has left the stage with their head hung low and a busted instrument in their hands because their strap just wasn’t secure enough.

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Category: Dunlop Strings, Tech Tips, Tip of the Week

The most common string types available to acoustic guitar players are Phosphor Bronze and 80/20 Bronze. What’s the difference, and which should YOU play?

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Category: Dunlop Strings, Tip of the Week

We’re re-releasing the much-demanded SF01 MXR Slash Octave Fuzz and the SC95 Slash Cry Baby Classic Wah. These pedals were first released on a limited basis back in 2012 in conjunction with Slash’s Apocalyptic Love record, but players all over the world have been clamoring for more ever since. So we decided to give you another shot at these great pedals, and what better occasion?

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Category: Artist News, Cry Baby, MXR

    More and more guitar players are using active pickups these days, and some of the world’s top guitar players—including Zakk Wylde and James Hetfield—have been using them for some time. What’s the big deal? What’s the difference between active and passive guitar pickups?   For this Dunlop Strings Tip of the Week, we’re […]

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Category: Tip of the Week

Invented by Brad Plunkett at the Thomas Organ Company in 1966, the wah wah guitar effect was named after the similar sounding muting technique perfected by jazz trumpeter Clyde McCoy. Thus, the very first wah wah pedal available to the playing public was named the Clyde McCoy Wah. That pedal’s throaty sound and highly expressive sweep is legendary, and the pedal itself has become a rare and expensive collector’s piece that many players are unwilling to play much less take out on the road. So what do you do if you want the legendary Clyde McCoy wah tone both in the studio AND on the road? Look no further than the CM95 Clyde McCoy Wah by Cry Baby.

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Category: Cry Baby

          We’ve done a few setup-related Tips of the Week, so we decided it was time for give you a little somethin’ for your next setup. With help from our friends at Nordstrand Pickups, EMG Pickups, and Cruz Tools, we put together a killer giveway package. Here’s what’s up for grabs: […]

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Category: Tip of the Week